How to Create an Audio Drama Series on Little-to-No-Budget

13321115_10156963692510481_1794294579_o.jpgby Pete Lutz

So you say you’re a creative type who has always wanted to put together some kind of artistic endeavour that will enthral the masses and make you big bucks at the same time?  Well, that’s really quite wonderful, but I’m sorry, you’re reading the wrong article.  No, this is for somebody who is desperate to provide a bit of entertainment to anyone who may listen, and to create that entertainment on an absolutely near-invisible shoestring budget.

Actually, this is more of a story about how I did it, and there are some steps here that I don’t recommend for everybody, but you should still know everything.  Well, almost everything.  I won’t bore you with all the sleepless nights I spent weeping over it like it was my own child.  Oh.  Looks like I just did.  So, why not read on?

PptSeason11. COME UP WITH A WONDERFUL IDEA.

Audio dramas are stories that are told so well that the listener can see it like a movie in his mind.  It’s your job to come up with that story.  You can do what I did, which is create an anthology series called Pulp-Pourri Theatre (each episode a standalone story with a beginning, middle and end), or you can go the way of a serial and have several episodes with a longer, drawn-out story.  The choice is yours, and you should go ahead and write the outline for your series.  No, go ahead.  I’ll wait right here until you’re done.  Got any magazines?

Continue reading “How to Create an Audio Drama Series on Little-to-No-Budget”

Meet Stephanie Chungu.

I was 14 when I told my parents I didn’t want to do the family route and study science.  I finally admitted them I wanted to write and it freaked them a bit, because they didn’t know how to get me where I wanted to be, whereas in pharmacy/nursing they know people.

You can consider me the black sheep in the family if you will. Myself and my cousin both take media courses – herself journalism and me studying Broadcast Media Production.

I won’t lie, I was scared breaking out in the media industry.  Taking an easy route into a job wasn’t what I wanted to do and I wanted a challenge.  Since joining Spark Sunderland in 2013, I’ve clocked up a whole calendar of hours (I’ve stopped counting since 150) of radio, and working behind the scenes.  I love doing it.  I love choosing the songs for playlist for my Urban Show on a Monday, choosing what content I should put in my daytime show, being in control of all the specialist programming, I just love it.

steph chungu

 

But the one thing that bothers me?  I’m one of the seven ethnic minority in the station. Media is not solely focused on BAME [Black and Ethnic Minority], and many just assume to put us in the Urban setting.

12874276_594724077360426_1486337790_o.jpgSo, when given the chance to go down to London to attend a masterclass held by BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra, I jumped at the chance.  It was a masterclass hosted by creative access, a programme committed to providing the best advice, experience and internship for BAME industry beginners.



The first day in London, I panicked.  Well, of course I did, I was in King’s Cross and was about to burst into tears because I didn’t have enough money to catch the tube home.  Oh how stupid I was, thinking that I could be so comfortable down in London on my own.

Eventually, I got to my aunt’s house.  And my cousin was so excited for this masterclass that she wasn’t even going to.  “You’re going to make it, Steph, believe me.” I tried. I really did.

Screen Shot 2016-04-11 at 18.37.26.pngOn the day, I wanted to look really good.  I mean, I’m going to my future workplace, I wanted to stand out.  Before making down in London I went to Newcastle and bought a whole new outfit, that screamed “I KNOW WHAT I WANT AND I’M GOING TO GET IT.” Continue reading “Meet Stephanie Chungu.”

How to not mess up your work experience placement

Today’s post comes from the genius audio producer that is Tim Johns, who is currently Reporter/Producer for The Jeremy Vine Show on BBC Radio 2.

I did a talk on this subject at this year’s Student Radio Conference in Cardiff.

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Yes, some of it is blindingly obvious, but I thought it needed saying because I see people come in for radio placements/internships/shadowing at Radio 2 a lot.  And so often, people get the little things wrong.

tim johns.jpgDon’t be useless at making phone calls

If you’re asked to pick up the phone and book a guest, take a deep breath and go for it. You need to be charming and persuasive. It can be slightly daunting making this first phone call in an open-plan office but if you come across badly and the guest says “no” that’s not great.

Continue reading “How to not mess up your work experience placement”

WTKieran!? – It Gets Better

12899791_10206255264964173_1892789150_nHello, Creatives!  Every once in a while, I like to post content by other creative people, especially emerging talent.  (I should say, if you’re interested in sharing your creative posts on the 99% Perspiration blog, I’m but a message away, via Facebook or Twitter.)

Kieran Brannan is a guy I know from university; I’ve not taught him, but seen him around Spark FM, the community radio station we volunteer at together.  And now, he’s graduating straight into a BBC position; a runner with BBC Scotland.

Well, I’ve long admired people who can post content about their emotions in connection with their creative self so freely; take a look around the posts here and you’ll see only positivity from me.  It’s not a defence, exactly, it’s how I want to present myself online.

So Kieran took part in today’s #99PodcastHour (every Tuesday, 7pm – 8pm GMT) and shared this;

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Kieran’s called his post “It Gets Better”.

Continue reading “WTKieran!? – It Gets Better”

99% Perspiration vs. Juice Festival – part 2

Ryan Kennedy and Jay Sykes

Ryan’s the one looking goofy on the left, I’m the one with less than cool fashion sense on the right. Who even wears knitted ties?

Juice Festival blog’s Ryan Watson caught up with me over lunch to chat all things creative, and why I make 99% Perspiration.  (You can read part 1 of the interview here, where we talked about questions, interview skills and preparation.)

We chatted about networking skills, building up confidence, creative opportunities, and about the inspiration behind making 99% Perspiration.

Could you tell me about some of the challenges in building up the audience for 99% Perspiration?

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Click here to listen to Sean Rameswaram, producer of Sideshow on WNYC & Studio 360, on 99% Perspiration

Podcasts do take a lot of work, a lot of time to build up – you’ve just got to keep going at it really.  I haven’t increased numbers as much as I’d originally hoped for, but I’ve increased numbers a fair bit since I began.  We’re into the thousands now, it’s taken a long time.

It’s interesting that you say numbers have not gone up as much as you’d hoped by now…

Yeah, I was hoping to have conquered the world by now.  (Jay laughs.)

Continue reading “99% Perspiration vs. Juice Festival – part 2”

Top Ten Tips – Preparing for Media Job Interviews

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Hello, Creatives!  Job interviews can be terrifying.  Let’s be honest; they’re a tiny window of time where you have to prove yourself to an employer.  There’s a big metaphorical spotlight shining down on you, and it’s warm and you’re sweaty, and you’re practically 99% Perspiration yourself!

We want to help you master those media job interviews, and by the end of these Ten Top Tips we hope you’ll know more ticks and techniques to excel in any media interview.

af1) Make the First Move

“I called ahead & asked to meet with the person who previously held the post.  Out of 9 people interviewed for the job, I was the one person to do that.” – Andrea Fairless, Careers Coach

While Andrea Fairless, (currently a Careers Coach at the University of Sunderland) stresses that she doesn’t know if this was a deciding factor in receiving her previous position as Careers Advisor for UK careers advice company Connexions, it certainly didn’t hurt.

Because of this phone call, Andrea was able to meet to talk about the environment at Connexions, what everyday tasks she would encounter, and other useful little tidbits.  Even if it’s just a short phone conversation with your potential employer, just having the time and the space to fire a ease a few concerns before your media interview can work wonders.

Continue reading “Top Ten Tips – Preparing for Media Job Interviews”

London-Bound – Ep. 23 of 99% Perspiration

Hello, Creatives!

Click here to download Alicia Myers' episode of 99% Perspiration

Click here to download Alicia Myers’ episode of 99% Perspiration

Both our guests on this week’s episode studied creative degrees at university, before pursuing creative careers with media companies based in London.

Alicia Myers is currently the Insight Executive for BBC Worldwide.  Alicia’s role involves leading a research team in a creative way; turning figures and facts into stories, to help BBC Worldwide sell their programmes worldwide.

But when we chatted a few weeks ago, she was about to enter her final week in the same role at Time Inc. UK, the magazine publisher behind InStyle, NME, Wallpaper, What’s On TV, and a handful of other well-loved magazines.

Alicia shares with us how she finds creativity, how to develop a thick skin, and why PR and research roles can be ideal if you love storytelling.

Click here to download Ganesh Rao on 99% Perspiration

Click here to download Ganesh Rao on 99% Perspiration

Ganesh Rao is an Output Producer with Sky News, having recently joined their team in early October.  With a solid passion in hard news journalism, Ganesh moved from Suddan, India to study journalism in the UK, and didn’t stop until he found a place in the industry.

On Episode 23 – London Bound, You can hear from Ganesh about how industry experience helped him on the way, and what made the young graduate stand out at the interview with Sky News.

And until next time,

Stay productive, stay awesome!