Your Work Experience Experience: Gemma Hirst, ITV Tyne Tees

12711148_10154548050454746_2161477098461425046_oHello, Creatives!  In their 2015 survey, the UK Creative Media Workforce Survey revealed that 77 per cent had done unpaid work experience – which is a staggeringly high number.

Here at 99% Perspiration, we want to make sure that you make the most out of your work experience placement, so we’ve asked a few key bloggers to document their “work experience experience”, and share it with us; the good, the bad, and the ugly.

(Also, see Tim John’s article on tips for how to make the most of, and not screw up, your work experience placement.)

This coming Wednesday, Gemma begins her three-day work experience with ITV Tyne Tees.  Not only will Gemma be shadowing members of their news team; writers, bulletin readers, editors…  She’ll be getting hands-on experience, helping film & edit ITV’s journalistic content.

Currently the Culture Editor for young writing start-up Kettle Mag, amongst writing for many online publications, Gemma is in her final year at the University of Sunderland’s Journalism BA.

Vlog one; Gemma explains how she snagged work experience with ITV’s journalism team, explains her passion for journalism, and enthuses about what lies ahead at ITV.

To find out more about Gemma Hirst, you can check out her blog, and check back with 99% for Gemma’s next vlogs.

Want to share your work experience opportunities with us?  We’re keen to share your stories; get in touch via our Twitter, @99Podcast.

nyf-gold-award-jay-sykes-circle-crop1And, as always,
Stay productive, stay awesome!

Jay Sykes
Executive Producer, 99% Perspiration

How to Impress on a TV Set – Gayle Woodruff

Today’s Top Ten Tips is filtered from an outstanding talk by Gayle Woodruff, from Northern Film and Media.  The talk was literally months ago, but it’s been sitting there in my notes, and in the back of my mind all this time.  And after so many of you got in contact following our post about Edinburgh TV Festival’s intense TV course “The Network”, I thought now would be a perfect time to share Gayle’s words of wisdom with you.

1) No Job is Too Demoralising

Gayle Woodruff“Some people might turn their nose up at a job that’s just making tea and coffee – but that’s the best way to get yourself in front of a whole TV crew.” – Gayle Woodruff, Northern Film & Media

What if you find yourself in the fortunate position of being invited to work on a TV set?  How can you make the most of your time on that TV set?  How can you stand out from the hundreds of other runners in your area, and really impress your TV employers?  With a huge thanks to Gayle, here are Top Ten Tips for kick-starting your – or how to impress a TV/film crew.
Continue reading “How to Impress on a TV Set – Gayle Woodruff”

The Network – Intense TV Training

Screen Shot 2016-03-16 at 17.15.39.png“TV is all about relationships.  We’re helping you kick-start those relationships.”

That’s Campbell Glennie of the annual Edinburgh TV Festival – every August, the @EdinburghTVFest is one of the highlights of the TV industry, bringing together around 2,000 people who work in TV across the UK and beyond, to network & celebrate.

Creative Futures, lovely folks as they are, kindly invited me to attend Campbell’s talk earlier today on their intense talent development scheme which runs alongside the festival, “The Network“.  If you live in the UK, and want to work in TV, this could be the gateway for you.

Continue reading “The Network – Intense TV Training”

London-Bound – Ep. 23 of 99% Perspiration

Hello, Creatives!

Click here to download Alicia Myers' episode of 99% Perspiration

Click here to download Alicia Myers’ episode of 99% Perspiration

Both our guests on this week’s episode studied creative degrees at university, before pursuing creative careers with media companies based in London.

Alicia Myers is currently the Insight Executive for BBC Worldwide.  Alicia’s role involves leading a research team in a creative way; turning figures and facts into stories, to help BBC Worldwide sell their programmes worldwide.

But when we chatted a few weeks ago, she was about to enter her final week in the same role at Time Inc. UK, the magazine publisher behind InStyle, NME, Wallpaper, What’s On TV, and a handful of other well-loved magazines.

Alicia shares with us how she finds creativity, how to develop a thick skin, and why PR and research roles can be ideal if you love storytelling.

And until next time,

Stay productive, stay awesome!

99% Extra – Mike Duddy

Mike Duddy is a freelance Sound Recordist / Post Sound Mixer / Audio Engineer, based in the North East of the UK.  His recent projects include working on ITV’s Beowulf, the BBC’s Dumping Ground, and on various feature films.

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Mike taught two sessions with our first year radio production students yesterday (where I lecture on audio production & journalism) on how to use boom poles effectively, and what to expect from a career in sound recording.

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So, the essentials.  “Being a boom operator is all about creative problem solving.”  Mike explained the art of being as discreet as possible whilst carrying out the role on set, whilst seeking the best quality audio possible.

“A little difference in space makes a big difference in sound, so you have to get as close to the dialogue as possible, without getting the boom in frame.”  They’re the very basic principles, of course, but the more you research and the more you practice, the more skilled you can become.  Down to memorising the spacial qualities of each lens being used.  That way, “if you hear a crew member shout out for a specific lens change, you’ll know instinctively how close you need to be.”

Mike asked the class what qualities they thought were essential to boom operation.  Second suggestion in both groups; being tall.  “Being tall is helpful, of course, but it’s not essential.”  What’s more essential to the profession is patience, steadiness, an ability to pick up scripts and sequences, and most of all, top-notch stamina.

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“You’re always chasing the best “polar pattern” (each different kind of microphone picks up a different shape of sounds around it).  It depends on the actors, of course; Hollywood types are professional at repeating movements and delivery in the same way with each take.”  But that’s not always the case, and a lot of the time he’s just acting on instinct to best capture the dialogue.

It must be a difficult task, to predict the movement of actors, but I was even more surprised when Mike revealed how he achieves this:  “I’ve learned to read neck muscles, they’re usually the first sign that someone is turning their head.”

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We’ve chatted about some of the fundamentals of recording sound, but what about the business end?  Some students asked Mike about how easy it is to pursue a sound career in the screen industries.

“Broadcasting companies like ITV and the BBC take on very few staff across their TV projects, and mostly use freelancers.  It’s standard to get on board with a fixed term contract, for instance my work on Beowulf was a 27 week contract.”

His advice mirrors Joanna Makepeace‘s recommendations in the latest episode of the 99% Perspiration podcast; “It’s mostly ad-hoc work – you’ve got to email producers, email line producers.  You’ll often get work from knowing people, knowing sound mixers, knowing boom operators, knowing film crews; so get out there and meet people.”

“It is quite a competitive industry.  There’s a lot of jobs, but a lot of people.  Stay professional, keep emailing.  Don’t pass up opportunities to meet people, to do work experience.”

“A lot of people say they’re keen to get into the industry, but many of them don’t get out there, aren’t proactive.  You’ve just got to do better than the guy next to you.”

“I watch a lot of TV shows, and you can get names from the credits and shoot them an email.  And then put yourself forward for shadowing, ask if there are any opportunities going…”

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And finally, one of our students asked the all-important question of how much you can make from a sound design career working in TV.

“You can get up to about £300 a day working with TV crews as a boom operator.  Which is better than a lot of professions!”

“And there’s a lot of work in commercials as well – there’s massive companies who spend millions on 30 seconds, so that’s great to get into; not just for sound, but for other industries too.”

If you want to find out more about Mike Duddy, and what it’s like to have a career in sound recording, make sure you check out his website.

 

 

Powerful Pitching & Top-Notch Networking – Ep. 22 of 99% Perspiration

Hello, Creatives!

Joanna Makepeace-Woods knows a thing or two about powerful pitching.  She gained her previous role, Talent Development Manager at the University of Sunderland, through pitching it to the staff there.  They were so impressed, so inspired, that they devised the role specifically for Joanna, and she’s been there ever since.

Click here to listen to Joanna Makepeace-Woods on 99% Perspiration

Click here to listen to Joanna Makepeace-Woods on 99% Perspiration

Now, Joanna is the Employability Manager with the university’s Arts, Design and Media faculty, and works with graduates and students to get them into the workplace.  She understands well the importance of networking, and getting your name out there.

“It’s a great feeling to know that you’ve opened a door for yourself…  You might be dying inside, but you’ve done it!”

I’ve listened to your feedback – some of you told me you wanted to hear more from people who help develop creatives, rather than just from creatives themselves; and Joanna Makepeace-Woods is just that person.

“It’s difficult, but I think you have to make time, even if it’s just an hour a month that you schedule in your diary, to touch base with people.”

Joanna also worked in multiple TV roles, mostly in the production office, so episode 22 of 99% Perspiration should be particularly interesting if you’re interested in getting more stuck in with TV.

“If you can concisely talk about something that you’re doing, people get it.  If you can do it in 30 seconds, they get it in 30 seconds.”

And until next time,

Stay productive, stay awesome!